Join Us At The Pride Center This Saturday

This Saturday, November 5th 2016 The LGBT Alliance will be tabling at the PRIDE CENTER in Wilton Manors from 8am to 2pm


HRC Broward Will be one of our special Guests Along with Congressman  Ted Duetch

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As we Promote Progressive Candidates and Civic Associations and events

Come meet our Local Candidates for office




It gets a huge crowd weather pending  

We will be here every first Saturday till after the November election

Hillary Clinton Urges Florida Voters to Get Out and Vote, Highlights What's at Stake in this Election for the LGBT Community

Democratic Strategist Ben Tulchin says Clinton's greatest strength is Democratic women age 50 and older, who not only support her but “identify with her.”

Yesterday, Hillary Clinton delivered a speech in Wilton Manors, Florida detailing her plans to fight for LGBT equality. Clinton began her speech with a call to action to get out the vote and to not listen to her opponent's campaign rhetoric that discourages women, young people, and people of color to stay home on election day.

Clinton told the attendees that LGBT rights are on the ballot and laid out her policy on LGBT issues. As president, Clinton will call on Congress to pass the Equality Act, which would protect LGBT people from discrimination. The Clinton administration will take on bullying, violence, and youth homelessness, which disproportionately impacts the LGBT community. Clinton will end the harmful practice of so-called "conversion" therapy for minors because LGBT children do not need to be "cured" of anything. Her administration will work to reform gun laws and keep guns from falling into the wrong hands so that what happened in Orlando never happens again. "America has to lead by example," she said, "We’re going to elevate this issue. We’re going to talk about it. We’re going to reach out."

Clinton also discussed bolstering the economy and the middle class, and guaranteeing equal pay for women.

Ending her speech, she stressed the importance of early voting and how to find one's nearest polling place.




Clinton's remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“[…] and I’m here with a lot of great people who are working so hard on this campaign. I want to thank Ken Evans […]. Thank you so much, Ken. I want to thank three members of Congress: Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz; Congressman Alcee Hastings; and your Congresswoman Lois Frankel. I also want to thank Sheriff Israel for being here. And Mayor Resnick just gave me a key to the city of Wilton Manors. And I want to thank my longtime friend and such a great leader, Chad Griffin, Human Rights Campaign president. I know that Chad told me there are a bunch of Human Rights Campaign organizers. And as I’ve said many times, HRC for HRC sounds good to me.

Well, my friends, just nine days left until November the 8th. Nine days that really will determine the outcome of the most important election of our lifetimes. And we cannot take anyone or anything for granted. It’s great to be here at the Manor Complex, a place that means so much to so many. And there have been ups and downs in all that we’ve gone through over the years, and even in this campaign, but I want you to know I am focused on one thing: you – your lives, your futures. The problems that keep you up at night. That’s what I’m interested in, and that’s what I’m going to be talking about here today and throughout the next nine days.

That’s really what this election is about. There’s a lot of noise and distraction, but it really comes down to what kind of future we want and who, as our president, can help us get there. So I want you to know – now, I just have to say I know I’m preaching to the choir. But I also, through you, want to talk to people who are still making up their minds, believe it or not, right? Because we’ve got a choice between a president who will bring us together, keep our country safe, get the economy working for everyone, not just those at the top – or someone who’s temperamentally unfit and totally unqualified for the job. You know, Donald Trump is doing his best to confuse, misled, and discourage the American people. I mean, he’s such a downer, right? And it’s time for him to stop fear mongering, stop distracting from what’s really at stake, and frankly, stop disgracing our democracy. We can’t let him get away with this.

But here’s the good news. Yes, America is great, and we can make it greater if we work together and we set some goals. But we are seeing Americans coming together – Democrats, Republicans, independents – to reject Donald Trump’s dark and divisive vision of our country. And it’s going to be really important that we make it clear to everyone in these last nine days what’s at stake. Because I really believe the vast majority of Americans agree with us. We don’t want a president who demeans women. We don’t want a president who has plans to break up and deport immigrant families. We don’t want a president who perpetrated the lie that President Obama wasn’t born in America. We don’t want a president who would appoint Supreme Court justices to overturn marriage equality. But I want you to know, the energy we’re now seeing out in the campaign is not just about what we’re against, it’s also about what we’re for. Because we also share a common vision. Beyond partisanship and politics, it’s a hopeful, inclusive America where everyone counts and everyone has a place, right?

And that’s exactly what I’m going to be fighting for in these last nine days. We’re going to honor people, not insult them. Donald Trump has insulted more than half of our population. African Americans, Latinos, immigrants, Muslims, POWs, women. And by what he has said, so many others who believe that you have a positive future. I agree with that: you do. And I promise you this: I’m going to keep working every single day for you and for the vision of America that we share.

Now, I will tell you, my mom taught me to never, ever quit, and what does that mean? Well, that means –”

AUDIENCE MEMBER: “Rise up.”

HILLARY CLINTON: “You got it. You got it. And it also means when you’re knocked down, what matters is whether you get up again. have been fighting for families and underdogs my entire life. I’m not stopping now. We’re just getting warmed up, right? And we won’t be distracted, no matter what our opponents throw at us. We’re not going to be knocked off course. We know how much this election matters, and we know how many people are counting on us. So we’re going to take to heart the words of our wonderful First Lady, Michelle Obama: When they go low, we go high.

We’re going to keep our foot on the gas because Donald Trump’s strategy is real simple. They’ve even said it in his campaign. Here’s his strategy about how he’s going to win: Get women to stay home. Get young people to stay home. Get people of color to stay home. Get the LGBT committee to say home. It’s all part of his scorched earth campaign, and it goes against everything we stand for. So you know how we’re going to stop him? By showing up with the biggest turnout in American history.

We need everybody to turn out and vote – women, young people, people of color, the LGBT community, Latinos, African Americans, Americans from all walks of life. Let’s break every single record. Let’s make that the story of this election. And here’s some really good news. This is amazing. More than 20 million people have already voted in this election, most of those votes in the last few days, 3 million of those votes from right here in Florida. Now, you only see numbers like that when people are standing up for what they really believe in. So if all of you vote, if your friends, your family, your coworkers vote, if everyone you talk to between now and Election Day votes, we are going to make some really big history on November the 8th.

And I want you not only coming out for me. I want you to reelect our members of Congress. And please elect Patrick Murphy to the Senate. And if there are still people who have doubts about the stakes in the election, listen to this. We’ve heard some outrageous things in this campaign. I’m sure we’ll hear more in the next nine days. But I got to tell you, I was beginning to think that nothing we learned about Donald Trump could surprise me anymore.

But yesterday the Washington Post published a report that was truly stunning. It starts with the story of a ribbon-cutting back in 1996 for a nursery school serving children living with HIV and AIDS in New York. Now, let me say, this is important in part to remember. This is a story about children with HIV and AIDS. So there was a big celebration honoring the donors who had supported the nursery school, and all the kids and their families, for whom this was the most important thing you can imagine. Because you know, back in the ‘90s, some of you remember. Right? Children weren’t welcomed in school.

And then, unannounced and uninvited, guess who barges in? Donald Trump. He walks right up to the stage. He sat down in the seat that was being saved for a local developer who had made a generous donation. None of the people working for the charity knew why he was there. He wasn’t a donor at all. He had never given a single dollar to help build the school. He just wanted people to think he had. So he sat on the stage through the program, even posed for photographs, and when it was over, he got up and walked out. No explanation. No donation. Now really, who does that? What kind of person does that? Really? I mean, who pretends to help kids with HIV and AIDS in order to make themselves look good? Well, I’ll tell you: The same kind of person who would pull a bait and switch on a high school chess team.

Back in 1997, he was principal for a day at a public school. That was a program we used to have in New York. The chess team was holding a bake sale to raise money to travel to a tournament. They were $5,000 short. He walked up to them and handed them a fake million dollar bill. At first the kids and their parents were excited. Then they were devastated to learn it was a joke. So he gave them 200 bucks and drove away in his limousine. Now, this story does have a happy ending because a woman read the story about Donald Trump’s behavior, called the school, and donated the $5,000. And the coach remembers this woman saying, “I am ashamed to be the same species as this man.”

Now, I got to say, any of you see the debates? Well, you know, I stood next to Donald Trump in three debates for four and a half hours, proving conclusively I have the stamina to do this job. Right? But a lot of what we’ve heard him say is part of a lifelong pattern. And here’s what the Washington Post concludes. ‘For as long as he has been rich and famous, he has wanted people to believe he is generous. He spent years constructing an image as a philanthropist by appearing at charity events and by making very public, even nationally televised promises, to give his own money away. It was in large part a fa├žade.’ And a months-long investigation by the Washington Post found that Trump had sought credit for charity he had not given or had claimed other people’s giving as his own.

Now, of course, because he’s refused to release his tax returns, we don’t even know if he’s ever given anything. But here’s what we do know. With Donald, it’s always Donald Trump first and everyone else last. He abuses his power. He games the system, and he doesn’t care who’s left holding the bag.

And here’s what else we know. Donald Trump has a terrible record on LGBT rights. And this election will determine whether we continue the progress we’ve made or let it be ripped away. We know Trump has promised he’ll appoint Supreme Court justices who will overturn marriage equality and that he will repeal President Obama’s executive actions to protect LGBT people from discrimination. And just this week, a new story came out that tells us a lot about how he treats LGBT employees. It’s a story of a maintenance worker at one of Trump’s golf courses. So I want you just to think.

This guy works hard. Works with his hands. Probably there 12 hours a day, maybe more, when it’s the summer season. After he told his coworkers he was gay, they started harassing him. They called him names. They even threw rocks and golf balls at him. It got so bad he ended up in the hospital. Now, his supervisor saw all of this and did nothing. So finally he went to the police for help. He was too scared even to come back to work. And what did the Trump golf course do? They fired him.

Now, this is a heart-wrenching story on a lot of levels. For starters, it’s a painful reminder of the harassment, violence, and discrimination too many LGBT Americans still face every single day. And it’s deeply distributing that instead of stepping in to stop this unacceptable behavior, Trump’s business punished the victim for coming forward. Now, if that’s how Donald Trump runs his business, what does it say about how he would run our country? We’ve made a lot of progress on LGBT rights, but as that story reminds us, we still have work ahead, don’t we?

There is still no federal law that stops an employer from refusing to hire someone just because he or she is LGBT, or a landlord from refusing to rent an apartment to a transgender tenant, and of course there are still states where you could get married on Saturday, post your Facebook photos on Sunday, and get fired on Monday just because of who you are and who you love. So here’s what I’ll do as president. We will call on the Congress to pass the Equality Act. And we will then be able to protect LGBT Americans from discrimination in all aspects of our lives. We’ll work together to achieve the AIDS-free generation that is within our reach. And we will take on homelessness, bullying, and violence, particularly youth homelessness, which disproportionately hurts LGBT kids. And we are going to end the harmful practice of so-called conversion therapy. LGBT kids don’t need to be cured of anything. They just need to be accepted and embraced and respected. And yes, we’re going to bring people together to reform our gun laws and keep guns from falling into the wrong hands so that what happened in Orlando can never happen again.

Now, some of you know, Chad Griffin and others know, this issue is really important to me. I traveled to 112 countries as your Secretary of State. I saw how countries around the world treated lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. And I believe with all my heart America has to lead by example. I want – I want LGBT people in every corner of our country – because don’t forget you all living in Wilton Manors have moved far away from a lot of the places where people are still scared today. Right? And we’re going to elevate this issue. We’re going to talk about it. We’re going to reach out.

So when you vote in this election, remember, it’s not just my name on the ballot. It’s your future. It’s who we are as a country. It’s every issue we care about. And make no mistake: LGBT rights are at stake. Dignity and respect for every American is at stake. The future of our economy is at stake.

I believe when the middle class thrives, Americans thrive. And we’re going to make America the clean-energy superpower of the 21st Century, too. And if we’re serious about supporting a middle class, we’re going to be supporting families.

The other day, I was in Pittsburgh. And there was a woman there with her young child. We’ve got some folks from Pittsburgh. She was shaking Tim Kaine’s hand. And she said to him, “I came here hoping I could tell you or Secretary Clinton I had my baby three years ago. And the next day, I was fired. It had been a difficult pregnancy. I called to ask if I could take a little time to recover, and the answer was ‘No. Don’t come back at all.’ Nobody, no parent, should ever have to make that kind of choice, but that’s also true when we talk about paid family leave, caring for a spouse or a partner, caring for an elderly relative.

I want us to recognize the way we live today. It is no longer the 1950s. We need to support people who are part of committed relationships, of families, of marriages, and give everybody the support you need to actually do what’s the most important thing in life. And that is caring for each other. We’re going to do everything we can to catch up to the rest of the world: affordable childcare, paid family leave, earned sick days, jobs with rising incomes. We’re going to raise the national minimum wage. No one who works full-time should have to raise a family in poverty.

And yes, we’re going to guarantee equal pay for women’s work. We’re going to make sure. We’re going to make sure that we not only grow the economy but we make it fairer. And I’ve got to tell you that’s such a stark contrast with Trump. He believes if you give the biggest tax cut in American history to the wealthy – that’s with trillions of dollars going to the top – that will somehow trickle down. It hasn’t worked. It won’t work. I believe that we could grow the economy from the middle out and the bottom up. And that’s exactly what we’re going to do.

So, my friends, we’ve got a guy who won’t pay his income tax. I mean, I’ve got to just say when we learned in the debate that he lost a billion dollars and that meant that he didn’t pay income tax for like 20 years, he said that was smart. And I thought to myself, how smart do you have to be to lose a billion dollars? I mean, really. And what kind of genius are you to lose a billion dollars while running casinos? But it’s serious because it means he’s paid zero, zero for our military, our vets, for healthcare, for Pell Grants, for our universities, our colleges, our highways. This is Trump to a T.

The stories that I told you about him showing up and acting like he’s done something, well, he shows up and criticizes our country. He shows up and discriminates against African Americans when he was denying them the right to rent apartments. He chose to make his products in other countries, not America. He’s built a career on stiffing small businesses. I take that personally. My dad was a small business owner. I’m sure glad he never got a contract from Donald Trump.

So, my friends, we’ve got work to do. And let’s get to that work. We’ve got to make sure that we get everybody out to vote. I want you to be able to say on November 9th you voted for a better future, you voted for a better America. And look how easy it is. It is so easy. Wilton Manors City Hall is just a half a mile down the street from where we are right now. And if you are registered in Broward County, you can go to any early-vote location in the county from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. all week. And if you have been mailed your ballot, make sure you fill it out and mail it back today. You can go to iwillvote.com to confirm your polling place. And make sure you have a plan to vote.

But, please, also help us in these last nine days. Every phone call you make, every door you knock on will make a difference. So go to hillaryclinton.com. Sign up to volunteer. Take out your phone. Text ‘JOIN,’ J-O-I-N, to 47246. I don’t want anybody waking up on Wednesday morning and seeing the results and getting depressed. I’m against depression. We don’t want that to happen in this election. Right?”

AUDIENCE: “No!”

HILLARY CLINTON: “I don’t want people to be sad because they didn’t do their part. We can’t let that happen. And I have to ask you if you – if you know anybody, if you know anybody, who is thinking about voting for Trump, you’ve got to stage an intervention. Do everything you can to try to convince that person that they surely care about something that Donald Trump is on the wrong side of because I can guarantee you they do because, after all, friends don’t let friends vote for Trump. Right?

So I am so grateful to all of you. Have many of you have already voted? Okay. So, now, how many of you will help us get somebody else to vote?  That’s what’s going to make the difference. Change is coming. Let’s make sure it’s the right kind of change. The choice is yours. We’re going to do everything we can to build a stronger, better, fairer America, coming together, healing the divides among us. And we’re going to prove, once and for all, that love trumps Hate. Thank you
.




After her speech she greeted the crowd who could not get inside the Manor Venue 

The Overflow Tent was overflowing with thousands so they just poured into the streets

Hillary Clinton Address The Crowds in the streets 




Photo Ken Evans

Photo Ken Evans 


Photo Ken Evans

Cher is coming to Miami Beach!

Cher is coming to Miami Beach!

On Sunday, November 6, Cher will headline the last Florida fundraiser for the campaign! Cher has been crisscrossing the country to discuss her views on this election and Donald Trump (which you may have seen on Twitter), and we are so incredibly fortunate to be able to welcome her to back to Florida. 

An Evening with Cher

Featuring DJ Tracy Young
In support of the Hillary Victory Fund
Sunday, November 6
Time TBD
Miami Beach, Florida
Fillmore Miami Beach at the Jackie Gleason Theater

Host:
 Contribute $2,700 or Raise $5,000
(Includes Host reception, photo with Cher, and Premium Seating)
Fighter: $1,000 or Raise $2,700
(Limited Availability; Includes photo with Cher and Premium Seating)
Supporter: $250
(Preferred Seating )
Friend: $45
(General Seating)

Clinton Campaign Memo: The Choice Facing Voters in This Election

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To: HFA GOTV Volunteers
From: Robby Mook
Re: The Choice Facing Voters in This Election
We are just days away from the most important election of our generation concluding. Already, over twenty million people have voted, which is an all-time record this early in the voting process. With the stakes so high, a record 70,000 volunteer shifts were completed this weekend alone to get Hillary and Democrats up and down the ballot elected. That’s more shifts than on the same weekend in 2008 or 2012 for President Obama--and those numbers will grow dramatically in the coming days.
I cannot overstate the fact that battleground states have that name for a reason--the result will be incredibly close and the presidency could hinge on the outcome.  Your work to communicate our message and get our supporters to the polls will be the margin of victory in these states.
Since each of you will be spending so much time talking to voters in the coming weeks, I wanted to brief you on what’s really at stake on in this election, so you can help spread the message. There have been a lot of ups and downs in this campaign. And a lot of distractions. But through it all, Hillary Clinton has stayed focused on what really matters: the American peopleTheir lives. Their families.  The kind of country we all want for our children and grandchildren. That’s what this election is actually about.  And when you clear away all the noise, the choice is stark.
We deserve a President who’s ready to bring us together… ready to keep us safe… ready to make our economy work for everyone, not just those at the top. But Donald Trump has proven himself again and again to be temperamentally unfit and totally unqualified to be President and Commander-in-Chief.
And let’s be clear: this isn’t just a question of temperament and experience, although those are vital qualities in a President.  What’s really on the ballot in this election are two different visions for America:  Donald Trump’s dark and divisive vision that could tear our country apart, and Hillary Clinton’s hopeful, inclusive vision that says we’re stronger together.
Over the course of the next week, you will hear Hillary Clinton explain this choice to voters, including the difference between:
A president who understands the challenging world in which we live or one who is too erratic and uninformed to have control of nuclear weapons
  • As a former Secretary of State and senator, Hillary Clinton brings an incredible amount of experience with the key issues facing America around the world. Traveling nearly a million miles as America’s top diplomat, Hillary has handled issues ranging from nuclear proliferation to military readiness, from women’s rights  to climate change, and is ready to lead from day one.
  • Beyond his lack of understanding of foreign policy and unwillingness to learn, Donald Trump is a loose cannon with some dangerous views on major global issues. Trump would encourage more nuclear weapons around the world, has insulted our allies and praised several authoritarian dictators.  He even encourageda foreign government to hack his opponent, and since then has refused to acknowledge the U.S. Intelligence community’s conclusion that the Russian government has done just that.
A president who has spent a lifetime fighting for women or one who has a career of demeaning and bullying them.
  • Hillary Clinton made history this year by becoming the first female nominee of a major party, but she has been breaking ground for women during her entire career. From her groundbreaking commencement speech at Wellesley to declaring for the world that “Women’s rights are human rights,” Hillary has been an inspiring voice, fighting for the rights of women around the world.
  • Donald Trump has a very different—and very disturbing—record. We’ve all heard the revolting comments he made on a bus 11 years ago, but while those comments were shocking and appalling, they were not surprising to anyone who has followed Trump’s many public comments over the years. Trump’s comments and actions would be unbelievable if he hadn’t spent years publicly insulting and degrading women who stood up to him, bragging about walking in on nude pageant contestants, who were often under aged, and making jokes about objectifying women. And to the women who have accused him of acting on his comments, Trump has threatened legal retribution.
A president who knows that we are stronger together, compared to one who would sow hatred and division.
  • Hillary Clinton believes in an America where everyone counts and everyone has a place. She’s spent her life acting on those beliefs, from her early work at the Children’s Defense Fund through a campaign that has consistently called out Trump’s division and hatred while offering a policy agenda that would bring people together and address the issues that keep us apart. Hillary has prioritized issues like immigration reform, ending LGBT discrimination and criminal justice reform.
  • Donald Trump set the tone of his campaign by insulting Mexican immigrants and has continued those insults and divisive comments through today. From Muslims to Gold Star families to a judge of Mexican heritage born in America to one of his own African American supporters just this past week, no one has been safe from Trump’s insults and lies. Trump has also built his political efforts around conspiracy theories, starting with the racist lie that President Obama was not born in America and support from hate movements like that alt-right—whose leaders Trump has been too slow to denounce.
A president who will fight for an economy that works for everyone or one who just fights for those at the top
The choice is clear. Americans deserve a president with the temperament and experience to tackle the issues facing our country and to work with all Americans to solve them, not a candidate who has proven himself time and again to be temperamentally unfit and unqualified to be President and Commander-in-Chief.  They deserve a president who holds the optimistic view that Americans are stronger together, rather than one who could destroy the values we hold dear and tear America apart.
In the coming week, voters have the opportunity to stand up for our values and reject Donald Trump’s dark divisive vision for America.  Thanks to your help, their voices will win the day.
For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

Bipartisan Group of Former DOJ Officials Raise Concerns Over Comey’s Breach Of Protocol



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Sunday, as reported by the Associated Press, a group of nearly 100 former federal prosecutors and high-ranking DOJ officials from both Democratic and Republican administrations, including former AG Eric Holder and former Deputy AG Larry Thompson, issued the following joint letter expressing serious concerns over FBI Director Comey's departure from long-standing department protocols:
As former federal prosecutors and high-ranking officials of the U.S. Department of Justice, we know that the impartiality and nonpartisanship of the United States justice system makes it exceptional throughout the world.  To maintain fairness and neutrality, federal law enforcement officials must exercise discipline whenever they make public statements in connection with an ongoing investigation.  Often, evidence uncovered during the course of an investigative inquiry is incomplete, misleading or even incorrect, and releasing such information before all of the facts are known and tested in a court of law can unfairly prejudice individuals and undermine the public’s faith in the integrity of our legal process.
For this reason, Justice Department officials are instructed to refrain from commenting publicly on the existence, let alone the substance, of pending investigative matters, except in exceptional circumstances and with explicit approval from the Department of Justice officials responsible for ultimate supervision of the matter.  They are also instructed to exercise heightened restraint near the time of a primary or general election because, as official guidance from the Department instructs, public comment on a pending investigative matter may affect the electoral process and create the appearance of political interference in the fair administration of justice.
It is out of our respect for such settled tenets of the United States Department of Justice that we are moved to express our concern with the recent letter issued by FBI Director James Comey to eight Congressional Committees.  Many of us have worked with Director Comey; all of us respect him.  But his unprecedented decision to publicly comment on evidence in what may be an ongoing inquiry just eleven days before a presidential election leaves us both astonished and perplexed. We cannot recall a prior instance where a senior Justice Department official—Republican or Democrat—has, on the eve of a major election, issued a public statement where the mere disclosure of information may impact the election’s outcome, yet the official acknowledges the information to be examined may not be significant or new.
Director Comey's letter is inconsistent with prevailing Department policy, and it breaks with longstanding practices followed by officials of both parties during past elections.  Moreover, setting aside whether Director Comey's original statements in July were warranted, by failing to responsibly supplement the public record with any substantive, explanatory information, his letter begs the question that further commentary was necessary.  For example, the letter provides no details regarding the content, source or recipient of the material; whether the newly-discovered evidence contains any classified or confidential information; whether the information duplicates material previously reviewed by the FBI; or even “whether or not [the] material may be significant.”
Perhaps most troubling to us is the precedent set by this departure from the Department’s widely-respected, non-partisan traditions.  The admonitions that warn officials against making public statements during election periods have helped to maintain the independence and integrity of both the Department’s important work and public confidence in the hardworking men and women who conduct themselves in a nonpartisan manner.
We believe that adherence to longstanding Justice Department guidelines is the best practice when considering public statements on investigative matters.  We do not question Director Comey’s motives. However, the fact remains that the Director’s disclosure has invited considerable, uninformed public speculation about the significance of newly-discovered material just days before a national election.  For this reason, we believe the American people deserve all the facts, and fairness dictates releasing information that provides a full and complete picture regarding the material at issue.
Signatories:
  • Eric H. Holder, former Attorney General of the United States
  • Stuart M. Gerson, former Acting Attorney General of the United States, former Assistant Attorney General
  • Donald B. Ayer, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • James M. Cole, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Jamie S. Gorelick, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Gary G. Grindler, former Acting Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Larry D. Thompson, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • David W. Ogden, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Wayne A. Budd, former Associate Attorney General of the United States, former U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts
  • Tony West, former Associate Attorney General of the United States
  • Neal Kumar Katyal, former Acting Solicitor General of the United States
  • Lanny A. Breuer, former Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division
  • Christine A. Varney, former Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division
  • Lourdes Baird, former U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Paul Coggins, former U.S. Attorney for Northern District of Texas
  • Jenny Durkan, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington
  • Melinda L. Haag, former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • Timothy Heaphy, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Virginia
  • Scott R. Lassar, former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois
  • Michael D. McKay, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington
  • Harry Litman, former U.S. Attorney for Western District of Pennsylvania
  • Neil H. MacBride, former U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia
  • Bill Nettles, former U.S. Attorney for the District of South Carolina
  • Timothy Q. Purdon, former U.S. Attorney for the District of North Dakota
  • Donald Stern, former U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts
  • Anne M. Tompkins, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina
  • Elkan Abramowitz, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • David B. Anders, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Jodi L. Avergun, former Section Chief, U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division
  • Marion Bachrach, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Richard Ben-Veniste, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and former Assistant Watergate Prosecutor
  • Shay Bilchik, former Director, U.S. Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
  • David M. Buckner, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Alex Busansky, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division
  • Helen V. Cantwell, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Sandra Cavazos, former Assistant US Attorney for the Northern District of California and the Eastern District of New York
  • Charles E. Clayman, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Joel M. Cohen, former Chief of the Business and Securities Fraud Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Leo P. Cunningham, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • Bert Deixler, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Keir Dougall, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Ira M. Feinberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Cary M. Feldman, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Martin Flumenbaum, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Stuart L. Gasner, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Hawaii
  • Douglas F. Gansler, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, and former Attorney General of Maryland
  • Faith Gay, former Deputy Chief of the Special Prosecutions and Civil Rights Divisions, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Gerald Greenberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Fred Hafetz, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • John Heuston, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Michele Hirshman, former Chief of the General Crimes and Public Corruption Units, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • Sydney Hoffmann, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • June M. Jeffries, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Marcia Jensen, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • John Joseph, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • Nancy Kestenbaum, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • David V. Kirby, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Vermont
  • Barbara E. Kittay, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, and former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • David S. Krakoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Larry H. Krantz, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Miriam Krinsky, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California
  • Laurie Levenson, former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Central District of California
  • Tim Lewis, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and former federal judge on the Third Circuit Court of Appeals
  • Lori Lightfoot, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois
  • Debra Long-Doyle, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Carl H. Loewenson, Jr., former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Jeffrey Marcus, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Richard Marmaro, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Douglass B. Maynard, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Seth Miles, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Amy Millard, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Curtis B. Miner, dormer Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Cynthia Monaco, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Martin Perschetz, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Elliot R. Peters, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Karen A. Popp, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Jeff Rabkin, former Assistant U.S Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, and for the Northern District of California
  • Daniel L. Rashbaum, former Assistant U.S. Attorney Southern District of Florida
  • Alicia Strohl Resnicoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • David H. Resnicoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • Lawrence Robbins, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Frank A. Rothermel, former U.S. Department of Justice Civil Fraud Prosecutor
  • Lee Rubin, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, and former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Betty Santangelo, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • John Savarese, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Richard L. Scheff, former Chief of the Corruption and Labor Divisions, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • William Schwartz, former Deputy Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • John Siffert, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • David Sklansky, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Matthew E. Sloan, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia and the Central District of California
  • Judge Mike Snipes, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas
  • Stephen R. Spivack, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Jeremy H. Temkin, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Eric Tirschwell, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Michael Tremonte, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Amy Walsh, former Chief of the Business and Securities Fraud Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Richard D. Weinberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Peter Zeidenberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, and U.S. Department of Justice Public Integrity Section
  • Lawrence J. Zweifach, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.
News Source: The Briefing

Hillary Clinton Rally in Wilton Manors: Video


Democratic Strategist Ben Tulchin says Clinton's greatest strength is Democratic women age 50 and older, who not only support her but “identify with her.”



She began the day by attending services at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Fort Lauderdale. Clinton then went to Wilton Manors for a unity rally at a local gay club. She spoke about her support for the LGBTQ community and equal rights. “I have been fighting for families and underdogs my entire life. I’m not stopping now,” she said. Clinton also spoke about her commitment to an AIDS-free generation. She attacked Donald Trump for his divisive rhetoric and urged everyone to vote on November 8th or to take advantage of early voting. A video from the rally is below.




After her speech she greeted the crowd who could not get inside the Manor Venue 

The Overflow Tent was overflowing with thousands so they just poured into the streets


Hillary Clinton Address The Crowds in the streets







Photo Ken Evans

Photo Ken Evans



Photo Ken Evans

Hillary Clinton will appear LIVE at The Manor Complex in Wilton Manors

WATCH THE VIDEO HERE






Hillary Clinton will appear LIVE at The Manor Complex in Wilton Manors
Venue Changed to The Manor Complex in Wilton Manors
Event Date: October 30, 1 p.m.
Join Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton as she appears LIVE and IN PERSON along with Chad Griffin, President of the Human Rights Campaign, Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, and other local officials in a rally to celebrate the LGBT vote. The rally, Community in Unity, is presented by Hotspots Media Group with partners such as HRC, AIDs Healthcare Foundation, and the city of Wilton Manors.  
There will also be amazing entertainment headlined by DJ Tracy Young, and including Joe Posa, DJ Doug Jackson, Jennifer McClain, Antonio Edwards, Nicolle Halliwell and many more.   
Due to expected inclement weather, the organizers have decided to hold the rally at the Manor Complex at 2345 Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. The event is scheduled to begin 1pm however with doors opening at noon. Due to limited space, it is highly recommended that attendees show up early to ensure their spot. Overflow space will be available outside of the Manor Complex.
The Community in Unity rally is FREE admission, and stresses the importance of voting in the 2016 election. Voters in Florida, an important battleground state, have the very real opportunity to select the next president, with the strength of the state's 27 electoral votes behind them.
Since 2010, Florida's LGBT community has seen a number of barriers fall: the ban on gay adoption is over, as is the ban on same-sex marriage. Nationally, we also saw the repeals of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" as well as the Supreme Court case U.S. v. Windsor, which nixed portions of the Defense of Marriage Act. That court case opened the door to Florida eventually legalizing marriage equality by court order on January 6, 2015.
LGBT rights are at stake in this election, with the two major candidates offering very differing pictures with regard to how they would handle issues pertaining to our community over the next four years. This rally encourages everyone to get out and vote, not just for the short-term, but also for a long-term vision of progress and diversity.

“If you are an LGBT American, or if you support the struggle for equal rights by LGBT Americans, please make a statement by attending this rally," Peter Clark, publisher at Hotspots Media Group, said. Indeed, the number of LGBT Floridians is estimated by Hotspots to be greater than one million.